United Scientific Franck-Hertz Apparatus Ii

SKU: VUSC-FHA002

Availability: In Stock

Regular price $3,288.00 $2,794.99

The Higher the Magnification - The More Detail You'll See

Magnification 40x
Magnification 1000x
Magnification 2500x

Magnification is the ability of your microscope to make small objects seem larger. As the magnification increases the area being viewed will be decrease is size but the detail of the area being viewed will improve.

Amscope microscopes come with multiple magnifications to aid you in finding the proper magnification for viewing each specimen.

Camera Connection Types

When comparing 2.0 and 3.0 there are few major differences. First the transfer rates. USB 2.0 offers transfer rates of 480 Mbps and USB 3.0 offers transfer rates of 4.8 Gbps - that's 10 times faster.

Camera Resolution

The most important factor in ensuring successful microscopic imaging is choosing the appropriate optics and camera for your application that gives you more data and higher image quality. When selecting a microscope camera, it is best to base your decision on the most important requirements for your microscopic observation.

Key Features

  • Argon-filled Franck-Hertz tube achieves 5-7 current maxima
  • Anode current range of 0.1nA—1?A
  • Automatically scan to oscilloscope or chart recorder, or manually scan
  • Adjustable, stabilized filament, grid, and anode voltages
  • 3-1/2 digit voltage and current readouts

€¢ Argon-filled Franck-Hertz tube achieves 5-7 current maxima

€¢ Anode current range 0.1nA€”1μA

€¢Automatic scan to oscilloscope or chart recorder, or manual scan

€¢ Adjustable, stabilized filament, grid, and anode voltages

€¢ 3-1/2 digit voltage and current readouts

The Franck-Hertz Apparatus II is an improved model of the well-known Franck-Hertz Apparatus (FHA001), featuring updated electronics with better stabilization and digital readouts for voltage and current (more robust, easier to read correctly). New fully shielded coax cables reduce electrical noise.

The Franck-Hertz Experiment yields basic evidence for the existence of quantum states. Inside a vacuum tube filled with a trace of argon gas, a beam of electrons is generated and accelerated towards a counterelectrode. A voltage barrier ahead of the counter electrode only allows electrons with a certain minimum energy to get through and make a detectable current. As the accelerating energy is increased, changes in the current are observed. On the way to the counter electrode, the electrons collide with argon atoms. At first, nothing happens, but as the electron energy rises, it reaches enough to give one quantum of energy to the argon to ionize it. Now the electron can€™t pass the voltage barrier and the current drops. The multiple valleys in the current curve are evidence of the donations of a quantum of energy.

Requires user-supplied dual-channel oscilloscope for automatic scan.

€¢ Argon-filled Franck-Hertz tube achieves 5-7 current maxima

€¢ Anode current range 0.1nA€”1μA

€¢Automatic scan to oscilloscope or chart recorder, or manual scan

€¢ Adjustable, stabilized filament, grid, and anode voltages

€¢ 3-1/2 digit voltage and current readouts

The Franck-Hertz Apparatus II is an improved model of the well-known Franck-Hertz Apparatus (FHA001), featuring updated electronics with better stabilization and digital readouts for voltage and current (more robust, easier to read correctly). New fully shielded coax cables reduce electrical noise.

The Franck-Hertz Experiment yields basic evidence for the existence of quantum states. Inside a vacuum tube filled with a trace of argon gas, a beam of electrons is generated and accelerated towards a counterelectrode. A voltage barrier ahead of the counter electrode only allows electrons with a certain minimum energy to get through and make a detectable current. As the accelerating energy is increased, changes in the current are observed. On the way to the counter electrode, the electrons collide with argon atoms. At first, nothing happens, but as the electron energy rises, it reaches enough to give one quantum of energy to the argon to ionize it. Now the electron can€™t pass the voltage barrier and the current drops. The multiple valleys in the current curve are evidence of the donations of a quantum of energy.

Requires user-supplied dual-channel oscilloscope for automatic scan.

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